News

Nomination Day - We’re official

I filed my nomination papers today at 10:00 a.m. I am proud to be running for a second term on City Council. I’m ready to earn your support, and to keep building a great city that is focused on a positive future.


Better Decisions at Future Capital Line Intersections

Throughout my first term on Council, I have heard from a number of constituents about their concerns and frustrations with the Capital Line LRT, specifically relating to the difficulties experienced crossing the intersections along 111 Street. Yesterday, a report was released that detailed the anticipated performance of the various intersections along the SE portion of the Valley Line LRT and to say this information was pleasing would be false.


Public Engagement that Mattered

Good decisions are rooted in good policy and good policy is built on a foundation of meaningful public engagement. In my first term on council nothing has received more of my attention than my focus on improving public engagement in Ward 10.


Bus Route Reallocation

IMMEDIATE CHANGES

As some of you may already know, Edmonton’s bus routes will be going through city-wide changes next week. After many months of research and route studies, the City will be paring back certain bus routes and reallocating “bus hours” from low ridership routes to high ridership ones.


Better Construction

I ran for City Council because I wanted to be a part of a team committed to building a great city. Because of this, I was a big supporter of an ambitious 2015-2018 Capital Budget. However, it is no secret that the City has seen its fair share of construction challenges. In particular, there have been concerns over a perceived lack of oversight and mismanagement of some of our major capital projects, in particular, the Walterdale Bridge, Metro Line, and 102nd Avenue bridge. There are also local examples too; drainage project gone awry in Greenfield lead to repeated attempts to fix a road properly. This is not okay.


Better Infill

Infill and densification has been an important issue in our city’s public discourse in the past 4 years. This is likely to continue through to October 16th and beyond. It’s an important conversation about Edmonton’s future.

I have learned a lot by listening to citizens in the past 4 years. 


The Politics of Dandelions

We have been hit by a ‘perfect storm’ this year for dandelions. This is due to a combination of stretched City resources trying to cover a rapidly growing city with more developed land, ample sunshine, and generous rain, which is doubly potent as it helps dandelion growth and hinders mowing. As a result, dandelions have grown at a rate of ½ inch per day versus the standard of ⅛ inch per day. 


Century Park: Vision, Hope and Accountability

Historic and Huge

Yesterday Council unanimously approved the Century Park redevelopment plans that would see the now largely unused site and parking lot transformed into a vibrant, dense, urban village. The President of Ermineskin Community League called the plan "historic and huge". After years of hard work on the Century Park file I am proud of the community league, the plan and the opportunities it will provide our city and residents. 


The Little Mall That Could

As anyone who knows me will tell you, I am a passionate backer of the Petrolia strip mall in Greenfield. In 2012, before I earned my spot on council, I started the Fix Petrolia Mall Committee with some neighbours. I remain just as committed today as I was then to ensuring the mall’s growth into a vibrant community hub. While development hasn’t always been as quick as I would have hoped, we have come a long way since 2012 and that is cause for celebration.


Recognizing Champions Takes More Than Signs

I was so sick I couldn’t go to school the next day. How could Steve Smith have done that? How did Fuhr not see it in time to lift his pad? I laid home in my bed. I was 14 years old. I was devastated. I played the goal over and over in my head. It was a terrible day for me and for the city I so badly wanted to live in.

I grew up in Drayton Valley, a smallish oilfield town, with my eyes and my future aimed squarely at Edmonton. My first glimpse of love for the city was as a fan of their football team. I still remember the great CBC montages of the five Eskimo Grey Cups spanning the late 70’s and early 80’s, with Waddell Smith, the great wide receiver, running away from the defense waving behind him as Kenny Loggins’ emotionally charged song Key Largo played over the images of dominance.


Solidifying Our Commitment to Neighbourhood Renewal

In 2009, Edmonton became, and still is today, the only city in Canada that has a program geared towards developing a long-term, cost-effective approach to fixing neighbourhood roads, sidewalks, and lights. At today’s Council meeting, we further solidified this commitment by approving a policy that protects the dedicated funds in the Neighbourhood Renewal Reserve, ensuring that this program can continue to build on its success.


Garden Suites - Raising the bar for laneway development

Garden suites can help to increase the vitality of mature neighbourhoods by preserving original and heritage homes and attracting new people. It is a sensitive way to add another layer to the fabric of existing neighbourhoods. But there's more to garden suites than just adding residential density and using existing land more wisely in a growing city. There are many positive benefits to this form of housing, such as; supporting flexible living options, providing affordable options for renters and helping homeowners offset mortgage costs. For those who wish to live near extended family, garden suites can be custom built for elderly with accessibility in mind while ensuring everyone has their own space. These smaller living spaces support social, economic and environmental diversity in mature neighbourhoods, with minimal impact on the existing streetscape or house. 


Council/Committee Round Up - May 2017

Alley Renewal

At Council this week, Council voted in favour of spending $20 million over the next 25 years on the Alley Renewal Program. This aggressive approach will allow for a faster pace when repaving alleys that have earned a failing grade of "F." Property owners would see an increase by 0.1 percent over four years, which for the average homeowner amounts to adding about $4 more to the tax bill each year. To learn more, the report can be found here.


Out of scale. Out of sync. Out of line.

The title of this post was carefully chosen to reflect my strong disapproval of the  Alldritt tower proposal. Quite frankly, I feel that it is out of scale with the river valley and out of sync with the Quarters' ARP. Additionally, I felt that the decision-making process was out of line with, what I consider to be, good governance. To further clarify my stance on the proposal, I've included my closing comments from yesterday's Public Hearing, below:

Image result for alldritt tower


A City Well Built - New Capital Project Management Framework

Capital Infrastructure Management Framework

At yesterday’s Council, Council passed a new policy - Capital Infrastructure Management Framework. The report outlines a draft policy approach to governing the management of capital projects. This approach relies on the implementation of the Project Development and Delivery Model to provide better information to make investment decisions and to provide improved information on project schedule and budget.